Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration

Retirement benefits

Dramatically More Americans Plan To Delay Social Security Retirement Benefits

According to May, 2017 survey, only 28 percent of 61-year-old respondents said they would receive Social Security retirement benefits as soon as possible (age 62).

This is a big decline from 2008, when 45 percent of 61-year-olds said they would file as soon as possible.

There are probably two reasons for this.

One, in 2008, many seniors could not find worthwhile employment, so getting Social Security was perhaps the only option.

When to Take Social Security in Retirement - Think "MATH"

MATH translates to :

* Market
* Affordability
* Taxes
* Health

Health -> Take Social Security early if your life expectancy is limited

Affordability -> If you NEED the money now, maybe you need to start benefits

Taxes -> If you're still working, your up to 85 percent of your Social Security benefits may be taxed

Market -> If the stock market is way down, maybe you need to start benefits soon

Five Social Security "Secrets"

Here are five Social Security "secrets" according to Motley Fool :

1. Your benefits increase each month you wait

2. Your benefits are taxable (at higher income levels)

3. You may be able to claim benefits based on ex-spouse's work history

4. You may be able to claim benefits despite no work history (ex. spousal, surviving child)

5. Social Security is not going "bankrupt" (but benefits may be cut)

US CFPB Cautions About Using Reverse Mortgage to Delay Social Security Benefits

Lately, some financial advisers have suggested that seniors delay taking Social Security retirement benefits. Instead of taking Social Security at age 62, for example, these advisers suggest using a reverse mortgage to "fund" your retirement and delay initiation of Social Security benefits until later. Delaying benefit initiation means a larger retirement benefit.

However, the US Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB) has cautioned that this strategy has drawbacks. The CFPB says the best way to increase future benefits is to keep working past age 62, if possible.

Can I Sign Up for Medicare Before Taking Social Security?

YES.

You can sign up for Medicare even though you haven't yet signed up for Social Security. In fact, delaying Social Security retirement benefits may work to your advantage.

However, you do not want to delay signing up for Medicare benefits. But, if you fail to sign up for Medicare during your initial enrollment period, you'll face a 10 percent increase in your Part B premiums that could raise your healthcare costs for life.

How to increase your Social Security retirement benefits after you started receiving them

This outlines an article which outlines how to rescind an earlier decision to take lower Social Security retirement benefits. By rescinding your decision to take early benefits, you can increase your retirement benefits -- but only after you pay back all your previous retirement benefits!

Note that we cover this same concept in this video.

Categories: 
Content Types: 

When to take Social Security Retirement Benefits - Wife early, Husband late

This video discusses when to take Social Security Retirement Benefits for the common case where a husband had higher earnings than the wife.

The strategy discussed here is to have the wife take reduced benefits early, while having the husband delay his receipt of retirement benefits.

The key here is that when the husband passes away first (a common occurrence), the wife will see a step up from her reduced benefits to her spouse's higher benefit level.

Categories: 
Content Types: 

Pages

Ads

Recent Content

Do Not Click on Links in Emails from "Equifax"

If you receive an email from "Equifax", be very careful about clicking any links in the email. It could be a phishing attack.

As a result of the recent Equifax leak of 143 million Social Security numbers, criminals see the leak as an excuse to tempt people into clicking on "helpful" links from Equifax.

Be very careful about clicking links in emails that you receive.

Equifax to Offer Free "Credit Freeze" Service After Security Breach

After the massive security leak of 143 million Social Security numbers at credit reporting agency Equifax, the company has announced that it will not charge for "credit freeze" requests for the next 30 days.

Here's where you can sign up for a credit freeze at the big three reporting agencies :

https://www.freeze.equifax.com/Freeze/jsp/SFF_PersonalIDInfo.jsp

Fast Facts About Social Security - 2017

Fast Facts About Social Security - 2017 Edition

* 66 million Americans receive Social Security benefits

* 5.5 million new Social Security beneficiaries in 2016

* 62 percent of aged beneficiaries received at least half their income from Social Security

* 54.2 is average age for Social Security disability beneficiaries

https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/chartbooks/fast_facts/2017/fast_facts17.pdf


Sponsored Links

Ads

Subscribe to RSS - Retirement benefits

Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration