Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration

Recipient Reporting Requirements

Excerpted from "Social Security Handbook". See the up-to-date, official Social Security Handbook at ssa.gov.

2126. Recipient Reporting Requirements

2126.1 Do you need to report events that affect your SSI benefits?

You must report events or changes in circumstances if they affect your eligibility or payment amount. You must make the report within 10 calendar days after the end of the month the event or change occurred.

2126.2 What happens if you do not report an event?

If you do not report an event that affects your SSI benefits, there may be a penalty deduction in later benefit payments as follows:

  1. $25 penalty for the first time;

  2. $50 penalty for the second time; and

  3. $100 for each subsequent failure.

We do not impose a penalty if you were without fault or had good cause for not reporting an event.

2126.3 What types of events must be reported?

You must report such matters as:

  1. Change in amount of earned and unearned income;

    When you report to us about changes in your earnings or work activity, we will give you a receipt to verify that you have properly fulfilled your obligation to report. Keep this receipt with all of your other important papers from Social Security.

  2. Change of residence;

  3. Marriage, divorce, or separation;

  4. Absence from the U.S;

  5. Improvement in the condition that created your disability;

  6. Certain deaths;

  7. Changes in income or resources for you or individuals whose income and resources are attributed to you;

  8. Eligibility for other benefits;

  9. Change in school attendance;

  10. Change in composition of the household;

  11. Change in citizenship or alien status;

  12. Becoming a fugitive felon; or

  13. Violating a condition of probation or parole.

  14. Admission to or discharge from a medical facility, public or private institution.

Last Revised: Jul. 25, 2006


Sponsored Links

Recent Content

Good Article on Social Security Benefits for Divorced People

This is a good article which outlines Social Security benefits for divorced people. The article refers to "divorced women", but it also applies to divorced men (especially if the woman had higher earnings).

Excerpt :

The law says a divorced woman, who was married to her ex-husband for a minimum of 10 years, is due essentially the same benefits as a woman who is currently married to her husband.

National Social Security Advisor Certification Available

If you're looking for advice on Social Security benefits, it may be useful to find someone with the "National Social Security Advisor" certification.

Although the NSSA appears to be a privately issued certificate, it seems to convey some level of knowledge about Social Security benefits. Finding a financial advisor with NSSA certification may be something worth exploring.


Sponsored Links


Sponsored Links

Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration