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How do I get a number and card?

To apply for a Social Security number and card:

  • Complete an Application For A Social Security Card (Form SS-5); and
  • Show them original documents or copies certified by the issuing agency proving:
    • U.S. citizenship or immigration status [including Department of Homeland Security (DHS) permission to work in the United States];
    • Age; and
    • Identity.

Then, take or mail your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office.
Citizenship or immigration status: We can accept only certain documents as proof of U.S. citizenship. These include a U.S. birth certificate, U.S. consular report of birth, U.S. passport, Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship. If you are not a U.S. citizen, Social Security will ask to see your current U.S. immigration documents. Acceptable documents include your:

  • Form I-551 (includes machine-readable immigrant visa with your unexpired foreign passport);
  • I-94 with your unexpired foreign passport; or
  • Work permit card from the Department of Homeland Security (I-766 or I-688B).

International students must present further documentation. For more information, see International Students And Social Security Numbers (Publication No. 05-10181).
Age: You must present your birth certificate if you have it or can easily obtain it. If not, they can consider other documents, such as your passport to prove age.
Identity: they can accept only certain documents as proof of identity. An acceptable document must be current (not expired) and show your name, identifying information and preferably a recent photograph. Social Security will ask to see a U.S. driver’s license, state-issued nondriver identification card or U.S. passport as proof of identity. If you do not have the specific documents they ask for, they will ask to see other documents including:

  • Employee ID card;
  • School ID card;
  • Health insurance card (not a Medicare card);
  • U.S. military ID card;
  • Adoption decree;
  • Life insurance policy; or
  • Marriage document (only in
    name change situations).

All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. they cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents.We may use one document for two purposes. For example, they may use your U.S. passport as proof of both citizenship and identity. Or, they may use your U.S. birth certificate as proof of age and citizenship. However, you must provide at least two separate documents.
they will mail your number and card as soon as they have all of your information and have verified your documents with the issuing offices.

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Fast Facts About Social Security - 2017

Fast Facts About Social Security - 2017 Edition

* 66 million Americans receive Social Security benefits

* 5.5 million new Social Security beneficiaries in 2016

* 62 percent of aged beneficiaries received at least half their income from Social Security

* 54.2 is average age for Social Security disability beneficiaries

https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/chartbooks/fast_facts/2017/fast_facts17.pdf

Do Not Click on Links in Emails from "Equifax"

If you receive an email from "Equifax", be very careful about clicking any links in the email. It could be a phishing attack.

As a result of the recent Equifax leak of 143 million Social Security numbers, criminals see the leak as an excuse to tempt people into clicking on "helpful" links from Equifax.

Be very careful about clicking links in emails that you receive.

Equifax to Offer Free "Credit Freeze" Service After Security Breach

After the massive security leak of 143 million Social Security numbers at credit reporting agency Equifax, the company has announced that it will not charge for "credit freeze" requests for the next 30 days.

Here's where you can sign up for a credit freeze at the big three reporting agencies :

https://www.freeze.equifax.com/Freeze/jsp/SFF_PersonalIDInfo.jsp


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