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Certificate of Election for Husband or Wife Between Ages 62 and FRA-Child "In Care"

Excerpted from "Social Security Handbook". See the up-to-date, official Social Security Handbook at ssa.gov.

729. Certificate of Election for Husband or Wife Between Ages 62 and FRA-Child "In Care"

729.1 When is a certificate of election filed to reduce husband's or wife's insurance benefits?

You may file a certificate of election to receive reduced spouse's insurance benefits if you were receiving unreduced (full) insurance benefits that are suspended because a child under age 16 or disabled is no longer in your care.

729.2 When does the certificate of election become effective?

The certificate of election is effective for any month in which you are:

  1. Between age 62 and full retirement age;

  2. Entitled to husband's or wife's insurance benefits; and

  3. Do not have in care a child (under age 16 or disabled) of the worker entitled to a child's insurance benefit.

729.3 Is the certification of election retroactive?

The certificate of election may be retroactive for as many as 12 months before the month you file it.

729.4 How long will the reduced spouse's benefit be payable?

Once you receive reduced spouse's insurance benefits, your insurance benefit rate will continue to be payable even after you reach full retirement age. The reduced benefits will continue as long as there is no entitled child in your care.

Last Revised: Feb. 17, 2006

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