Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration

The 'Optimal' Age to Claim Social Security Benefits : 65

According to a study, the optimal Social Security claiming age for a 55-year-old single man with a life expectancy of 76 is age 65, according to a HealthView Services analysis.

This of course depends on health and life expectancy, but since delaying Social Security benefits results in an 8 percent higher benefit, it's best to not claim early according to a HealthView Services analysis.

What is the Maximum Social Security Retirement Check?

The average Social Security check is $1,372 per month, or $16,464 per year.

The highest Social Security check when initiating benefits at "full retirement age" (age 66 if you were born between 1943 and 1954) is $2,788 a month, or $33,456 a year.

The highest Social Security check when initiating benefits at age 70 is $3,680 a month, or $44,162 a year.

Three Questions to Ask Before Claiming Social Security

1. Am I in good health?

If yes, consider deferring benefits.

2. Will my claim affect anyone else?

Higher-earning spouses often benefit by waiting until their full retirement age or later to sign up for Social Security.

3. How reliant will I be on Social Security income?

If you don't have much in savings, and are in good health, consider continuing to work.

Pages


Sponsored Links

Recent Content

Four Factors that Determine Your Social Security Retirement Benefit

Your Social Security retirement benefit largely depends on the following four factors :

* Your work history => Longer yields a higher benefit

* Your earnings history => Higher earnings yields higher benefit (at decreasing rate)

* Your birth year => Born earlier means higher relative benefit

* Your claiming age => Starting benefits later means higher benefit

What Social Security May Look Like in 2035

Interesting article which looks at how Social Security may fare in the year 2035.

Highlights :

* The worker-to-beneficiary ratio will drop from 2018's 2.8 to 2.2-to-1.

* Workers will have to wait longer to receive "full" benefits

* Social Security's "trust fund" will be exhausted

* Substantial benefit cuts may be needed

* Payroll taxes will be critical to pay for benefits

* Social Security benefits will continue to decline due to inflation

Ads

Ads

Subscribe to moneyhop.SocialSecurityHop.com RSS

Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration