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Change name on a Social Security card

How do I change or correct the name on my Social Security card?

To change your name on your Social Security card:

  • Show documents proving:
    • Legal name change; and
    • Identity; and
    • U.S. citizenship (if you have not already established your citizenship with us), or immigration status if you are not a U.S. citizen.
    • All documents submitted must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. The SSA cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents.

Information about required documents

Identity

You must show a recently issued document as proof of your legal name change. Documents the SSA may accept to prove a legal name change include:

  • Marriage document;
  • Divorce decree;
  • Certificate of Naturalization showing a new name; or
  • Court order for a name change.

If the document you provide for a legal name change does not give enough information to identify you or if you legally changed your name more than two years ago, then you also must show two identity documents including:

  • One document in your old name; and
  • A second document with your new legal name.

In addition to your name, these documents also must contain identifying information or a recent photograph.

Citizenship

If you are a U.S. citizen born outside the United States and SSA records do not show you are a citizen, you will need to provide proof of your U.S. citizenship. If you are not a U.S. citizen, SSA will ask to see your current immigration documents.

The new card will have the same number as your previous card, but will show your new name.


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Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration