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What evidence is required for a child born out of wedlock to be considered yours?

Excerpted from "Social Security Handbook". See the up-to-date, official Social Security Handbook at ssa.gov.

1708. What evidence is required for a child born out of wedlock to be considered yours?

If your child was born out of wedlock, he or she may be considered your child if he or she is the child of an invalid ceremonial marriage, or if the special test described in §324(E) is met. The evidence required to meet this special test may be:

  1. A written acknowledgment by you stating the child is your son or daughter;

  2. A court decree finding that you are the father or mother;

  3. A court order directing you to support the child because the child is your son or daughter; or

  4. Other satisfactory evidence that you were the father or mother of the child and were living with, or contributing to, the child's support.

Last Revised: March, 2001

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