Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration

Redeterminations

Excerpted from "Social Security Handbook". See the up-to-date, official Social Security Handbook at ssa.gov.

2615. Redeterminations

There are no mandatory reporting rules in the program for extra help with Medicare prescription drug costs. However, the law requires that SSA periodically redetermine a person's continuing eligibility for extra help with Medicare prescription drug costs and the amount of that extra help. We will schedule a redetermination of a person's eligibility for the extra help about a year after eligibility began. Each year, we will select cases for redetermination in the period August through December, rather than throughout the year. The redeterminations will generally be conducted by mail rather than face-to-face. Also, if you experience one of the events in §2615.1, you may want to request a redetermination if the event reduces your income and/or resources.

2615.1 What events can result in a redetermination of the amount of extra help you receive before the periodic redetermination?

  1. You get married;

  2. You and your spouse who lives with you divorce;

  3. Your spouse who lives with you dies;

  4. You and your spouse who lives with you separate;

  5. You and your spouse who lives with you have your marriage annulled; or

  6. You and your previously separated spouse begin living together again.

2615.2 What happens to your extra help with Medicare prescription drug costs after you notify SSA of an event?

Certain changes in your situation (above) may affect the amount of extra help that you can receive to pay for your prescription drug costs. Based on the event and circumstances reported, SSA may adjust the amount of extra help you receive.

Last Revised: Jul. 30, 2007


Sponsored Links

Recent Content

Four Factors that Determine Your Social Security Retirement Benefit

Your Social Security retirement benefit largely depends on the following four factors :

* Your work history => Longer yields a higher benefit

* Your earnings history => Higher earnings yields higher benefit (at decreasing rate)

* Your birth year => Born earlier means higher relative benefit

* Your claiming age => Starting benefits later means higher benefit

What Social Security May Look Like in 2035

Interesting article which looks at how Social Security may fare in the year 2035.

Highlights :

* The worker-to-beneficiary ratio will drop from 2018's 2.8 to 2.2-to-1.

* Workers will have to wait longer to receive "full" benefits

* Social Security's "trust fund" will be exhausted

* Substantial benefit cuts may be needed

* Payroll taxes will be critical to pay for benefits

* Social Security benefits will continue to decline due to inflation


Sponsored Links


Sponsored Links

Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration