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What if my card is lost or stolen?

You can replace your card or your child’s card for free if it is lost or stolen. However, you are limited to three replacement cards in a year and 10 during your lifetime. Legal name changes and other exceptions do not count toward these limits. For example, changes in noncitizen status that require card updates may not count toward these limits. Also, you may not be affected by these limits if you can prove you need the card to prevent a significant hardship.

To get a replacement card, you will need to:

  • Complete an Application For A Social Security Card (Form SS-5);
  • Present a recently issued document to show your identity;
  • Show evidence of your U.S. citizenship if you were born outside the United States and did not show proof of citizenship when you got your card; and
  • Show evidence of your current lawful noncitizen status if you are not a
    U.S. citizen.

Your replacement card will have the same name and number as your previous card.

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2. Not knowing you can file for benefits three months in advance of receiving income

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4. Thinking early filers can later receive 'full benefits'. If filing early, your benefits are permanently reduced.

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A recent poll found about half of respondents made mistakes on the following :

1. Retirement benefits will not be reduced if I claim at age 65 => FALSE. Full retirement age is rising.

2. A spouse can receive Social Security even if they have no earnings history => TRUE

3. If my spouse dies, that will have no effect on my Social Security payment => FALSE

4. Social Security benefits depend only on my earnings history, not when I claim => FALSE

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1. Social Security will cover my income needs

2. It's better to take Social Security benefits early

3. I'll receive full benefits at 65

4. Once I start benefits, I can’t work anymore

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Not affiliated with the US Social Security Administration